Google lets publishers defend site content

Published on
by Brafton Editorial
Google officials have told Search Engine Land that the company is not making any major algorithmic adjustments, as it believes its current algorithm is doing a fine job of rewarding high-quality sites.

Yesterday, Brafton reported that some searchers are satisfied with the results of Google’s updated algorithm, pleased that “specialty sites” producing industry-specific content are gaining ground in rankings. We also covered Google Fellow Amit Singhal’s statement to Wired indicating that the company is working to update its algorithm so that high-quality sites won’t be impacted negatively.

Now, Google officials have told Search Engine Land that the company is not making any major algorithmic adjustments, as it believes its current algorithm is doing a fine job of rewarding high-quality sites. While Wired reported that one high-profile site, Cult of Mac, dropped significantly in the initial aftermath of the new algorithm only to rapidly recover rankings, Google claims it has not manually fixed this issue, nor has it made significant updates to the algorithm.

Instead, Google says it is making the minor tweaks that it has always made to its algorithm. The company told Search Engine Land that Cult of Mac likely benefited from these routine tweaks.

Though Singhal said yesterday that the Google team is working for “100 percent accuracy” to counter false penalties, the search giant is now speaking in stronger defense of its algorithm. Google advises people to “extensively evaluate their site quality” if they find the new algorithm has a negative impact, reports Search Engine Land.

However, the company is not turning its back on publishers who feel their site content has been misjudged. Singhal told Search Engine Land that users can file reports through the Google Webmaster Central services. (The source advises site owners to use a reconsideration request form.) The company has also opened a related discussion forum for users to express concerns over penalties.

While it seems publishers of original, industry-specific content are faring well with the new algorithm, other site owners can rest assured that investment in high-quality content can help improve any adverse impact. As Brafton reported, Matt Cutts recently spoke about how to get Google penalties lifted, encouraging marketers to fix their sites.

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