Despite the newly released copyrighted content ranking factor, YouTube and other sites with predominantly user-generated content are unlikely to be impacted should they actively attempt to remove illegally shared content.

User-generated content sites that struggle to remove all copyrighted material shared on their network may be unharmed by Google’s new ranking signal. On Friday, Google’s Amit Singhal reported that sites that receive frequent copyright infringement complaints will be negatively impacted in search. Search Engine Land reported highlighted that YouTube is one of the sites peppered with these requests more than most.

According to Google, sites heavy on user-generated content that actively attempt to remove copyrighted material will likely see their standing in search unharmed. The number of takedown notices filed with a company will not be the lone element of the ranking factor. Part of YouTube’s ability to remain untouched by the new signal includes its internal usage guidelines and the availability of forms to file takedown requests with the site.

Those using video as part of a content marketing campaign and hosting with YouTube can be assured that traffic to the site remains high.

In general, any site making a legitimate effort to remove copyrighted material is unlikely to see major changes.

Brafton has highlighted the growing popularity of video content as part of both marketing campaigns and Americans’ overall web browsing habits. ComScore reported that more than 11 billion video ads were viewed in June, and YouTube was among the top sites for serving this content. Google’s announcement that YouTube is unlikely to be hurt by its new algorithm is a good sign for the marketers hosting their video marketing material on the platform. 

Joe Meloni is Brafton's former Executive News and Content Writer. He studied journalism at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has written for a number of print and web-based publications.