Rising search activity demonstrates the value of SEO for companies implementing web marketing campaigns and measuring their success

A report from comScore found that both Google and Bing reached an all-time high in terms of search queries in June, fielding 11.4 billion and 2.7 billion searches respectively. With search activity building, marketers have more opportunities to reach audiences through SEO. Google’s market share rose 0.1 percentage points to 66.8 percent of the total market, compared with 15.6 percent for Bing sites.

The data includes only desktop search queries, while mobile search continues a similarly strong rise. Exact mobile numbers from the two search leaders are not available. However, Brafton recently highlighted data from BIA/Kelsey that found search from smartphones and tablets is projected to surpass 30 billion by the end of 2012.

Yahoo’s place within search continues to dwindle. Despite fielding more than 2.2 billion total searches in June, the company’s share in the market fell by 0.4 percentage points to 13 percent in the month. Based on recent releases from comScore, this represented the 10th-consecutive month of lost share for the company.

Moreover, Yahoo has struggled with other services in recent years, now on its fourth CEO in the last 24 months. Additionally, the company has announced the cancellation of a number of services recently, including its web analytics platform. This comes as Bing heads in the opposite direction, attracting new users and launching services aimed at making its engine more useful for both marketers and users.

With search activity building, marketers have more opportunities to reach audiences through SEO. Google’s market share rose 0.1 percentage points to 66.8 percent of the total market, compared with 15.6 percent for Bing sites.

With SEO serving as a critical element of web marketing campaigns, Bing has rolled out tools to help companies own their search presence more effectively. Its inbound link disavowing tool enables websites to remove the impact of low-quality sites linking to their pages. In the past, companies have used tactics, such as buying links or using article marketing sites, to artificially boost search standing on major search engines. However, it’s inevitable that a site will receive low-quality links organically, and disavowing them can remove the negative impact they have on a search ranking.

Google is said to be rolling out a similar tool in the future. In the meantime, its other advancements withits web analytics tools have helped companies maximize the potential impact of organic search marketing. Citing a recent case study from Google, Brafton reported that acting on data from analytics allowed one company to make the adjustments necessary to boost conversions by more than 30 percent.

Joe Meloni is Brafton's former Executive News and Content Writer. He studied journalism at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has written for a number of print and web-based publications.