A pair of surveys found that consumers are not fans of the proposed lowering of Facebook's age requirement and they are uncertain of a video chat feature.

A pair of surveys from AYTM Market Research revealed that many Facebook users are unhappy with potential adjustments to the site, including lowering an age requirement to 8 and the addition of video chat.

Seventy-eight percent of respondents said they regularly use Facebook and other social networks. However, less than 10 percent said that those under 10 years old should be eligible to use social networks. Similarly, only 15 percent said that they would use a Facebook video chat feature.

Frequently, users have said they dislike proposed Facebook changes and new features, only to use them in droves once they roll out – the Timeline profile layout being the best example. Moreover, those using the site for social media marketing have been able to leverage many of these features to improve visibility and attract new prospects.

Targeting content to those under the current Facebook age requirement of 13 may be difficult for marketers, so this proposal would likely have minimal effects. However, the video chat feature could help companies host webinars with their fans. Much like the Google+ Hangout, the combination of video and social marketing presents interesting opportunities for companies. Even though AYTM Market Research’s poll suggests it will take time for users to come around to Facebook video chats, engaging with brands via social is an increasingly popular activity for many consumers.

Brafton recently reported that 81 percent of consumers said a brand’s social content impacts their purchase decisions as much as advice from friends. As more people start using social to keep track of companies they regularly shop at, the importance of diverse social content will only increase.

Joe Meloni is Brafton's former Executive News and Content Writer. He studied journalism at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has written for a number of print and web-based publications.