Pinterest traffic referrals continue to decline, Google growing as traffic source

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by Brafton Editorial
A report from Shareaholic found that Pinterest has struggled to sustain its growth, while Google has continued to refer more traffic.

Shareaholic recently reported that Pinterest’s value as source of website traffic continued its drop in April. As the site became increasingly popular in late 2011, it entered 2012 generating a substantial volume of site visits for businesses. However, from its high point of driving 1.05 percent of all web traffic in February, it has since fallen to 0.74 percent in April. Although it still currently holds weight as a social marketing platform, these figures might businesses question whether Pinterest is a waning fad.

The data measured considers traffic referrals to the 270,000 websites using Shareaholic’s platform. Pinterest continues to add users, but the wave it rode in 2011 has dwindled. Nonetheless, social media marketing campaigns using Pinterst can still be effective, especially for sites sharing visual content.

Facebook generated more than 6.1 percent of traffic measured by Shareaholic, while Twitter held steady from March, accounting for 0.85 percent of traffic referrals in April.

While social networks are invaluable traffic sources, SEO is still a must for brands. Traffic from organic Google search listing gained 0.4 percent in April, reaching 48.88 percent of all delivered hits.

Bing also recorded modest traffic increases in the month, referring 1.29 percent traffic compared to 1.27 in March.

Brafton recently highlighted its latest algorithmic adjustment, Penguin, which focuses on punishing sites with webspam.

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  • http://www.facebook.com/scottwayres Scott Ayres

    Not a big surprise to me at all. I’ve said all along the interest in Pinterest could not last. It’s a site you go to a few times, post some stuff, look at some stuff then get distracted by a video of a cat playing with yarn and never go back to. They better hope Facebook or Google buys them before they are forgotten about…