As a four-year Brafton veteran, Perry Robbin has found there are a few similarities – as well as some welcome differences – between the worlds of journalism and content marketing. A graduate of the University of Connecticut and journalism-degree holder, Perry got his start reporting and writing for small, local papers in the Northeast.

“I was born and grew up in northern Connecticut and have experience doing that type of writing,” Perry said. “Writing is just something that came naturally.”

From print to online

However, producing content for print includes certain caveats that simply come with the job of being a reporter. So when Perry came upon a Craigslist ad for Brafton, at the time an up-and-coming content marketing firm, he jumped at the opportunity to change sectors.

“The hours are steadier and so is the overall industry,” Perry explained. “You also don’t have to chase someone down for a quote when they’re in their darkest moments following an arrest or court case or death, or something really heavy like that.”

Perry’s new role within Brafton would still see him doing interviews and leveraging the information and quotes for written content, and he was able to call upon his journalism background to support this process.

“Learning how to interview people as a reporter – how to have an idea of what you want your final product to look like and working backwards from there, but also taking the substance of the interview into account to make changes – is probably the most useful skill I had coming into Brafton,” he noted.

Many of the interviewees that Perry now works with are more than happy to speak and be a part of the content creation process. After all, content marketing enables our prospects to discuss, highlight and brag (where appropriate) about their businesses, their services and the wins they’ve experienced with clients – a big departure from the types of interviews that can come with print journalism.

“I really admire people who can do that kind of thing day after day, though,” Perry said. “It helps when conducting interviews for a project and on regular client calls, kickoffs, etc. – knowing how to ask a question to get an answer that addresses my needs or uncertainties is very valuable in general.”

A mix of content keeps Perry on his toes

Another benefit is Perry’s ability to leverage the wide variety of clients Brafton has within its portfolios and the different types of content and projects they request. It’s this varied combination of different types of work that helps Perry keep things continually interesting.

“The mix of clients is very refreshing,” Perry noted. “I don’t have to write about a single topic every day and can mix in what feels like easier or fun writing with more complicated or technically demanding work.”

“The mix of clients is very refreshing,” Perry noted. “I don’t have to write about a single topic every day and can mix in what feels like easier or fun writing with more complicated or technically demanding work.”

What’s more, Perry’s interview work helps him build and expand his expertise in different areas, establishing robust subject matter knowledge that he can utilize for clients in specific industries and service areas.

“Some interviews, depending on topic, can also be general learning experiences,” Perry said. “Hearing someone discuss a subject they deeply understand and care about can be fascinating.”

It is this immersive style that makes Perry’s and other Brafton writers’ work more in-depth, personal and aligned with each client’s unique specifications.

A flexible working schedule

Perry also enjoys the ability to work remotely and have more flexibility within his daily and weekly schedule. Perry and other Brafton writers operate on a monthly schedule for each client, completing a set number of words on client-approved topics, evenly spaced out and delivered for publication throughout the month. In this way, readers are able to access a steady stream of interesting and valuable content.

“Hearing someone discuss a subject they deeply understand and care about can be fascinating.”

“Setting deadlines and staying ahead of where I should be is a good way for me to make sure my work gets done,” Perry said. “It’s nice to work ahead during the week and make Fridays a lighter day – I really enjoy having that flexibility here.”

This type of schedule also allows Perry to be the best dad to his 4-year-old, Rocky.

“Being a remote writer is also a great perk,” Perry noted. “Our dog is a rescue and he has some anxiety issues that we’re working through. He’s made a ton of progress – he’s very brave and a great pet overall – but it takes a lot of time. I doubt we could properly take care of him if I couldn’t work from home.”

Leveraging journalistic know-how for the benefit of marketing clients

Approaching his 5-year Braftiversary, Perry has built up quite a bit of knowledge – not only when it comes to specific industry subject matter expertise, but also how to provide the best content for clients.

“Having the experience to drill down into what clients initially say they want and figure out the best way to approach that need is really important,” Perry said. “That can mean highlighting a different approach or type of content that would work better, even if it’s counter to the client’s initial ideas. I think the mix of understanding and appreciating client desires, but knowing enough to confidently point out a different direction, when it’s necessary, helps them in the long run.”

Jessica Wells is a senior writer and editor at Brafton, working remotely from Hawaii. When she's not writing, Jessica enjoys paddle boarding, snorkeling and enjoying the view (and a cocktail) from her beach chair.