Please enable JavaScript! Keep your prospects updated with news content: 76 percent regularly read news
AYTM Market Research reported that 76 percent of consumers regularly access news content on the web, and marketers can leverage the trend to build brand authority.

Keep your prospects updated with news content: 76 percent regularly read news

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Providing timely, industry-relevant updates helps sites stand out on the web, as more than 76 percent of consumers access news content, according to AYTM Market Research. While some still prefer to get information through printed newspapers and magazines, most spend their time browsing the internet for the latest in industries and other areas they care about.

News content marketing strategies offer prospects valuable insights on industry developments that indicate a brand wants to inform them. Moreover, AYTM’s data suggests there are several different types of news content marketers can use to reach their target audiences. More than 41 percent said they access news content on the web for in-depth articles, and 52.8 percent said they enjoy pieces they can’t find from different sites.

A major goal of any content marketing campaign is winning relevant traffic to populate a sales funnel. A strategy that actively educates an audience conveys site’s thought leadership and understanding of a prospect’s motivations. Ultimately, the success of any campaign comes down to a company’s ability to produce high-quality site content.

Sites using news content marketing frequently rely on press releases and other web sources to develop their articles. However, some question this practice due to the possible SEO ramifications related to duplicate content issues. Brafton recently highlighted comments from Google’s Matt Cutts that confirmed relevant quotes won’t cause problems when content writers cite and link to sources.

Joe Meloni
Joe Meloni is Brafton's former Executive News and Content Writer. He studied journalism at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has written for a number of print and web-based publications.

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