Janrain reported that Facebook is still the premier social login tool, accounting for 48 percent of logins, and marketers can increase engagement with their website content by allowing users to log into their sites through Facebook information.

A report from Janrain found that Facebook is still the preferred social login tool among consumers, as 48 percent of all users turn to their Facebook login information to interact on other sites. According to Janrain’s study, encouraging people to use Facebook to login to a site could increase engagement. Providing an easy method for prospects to engage with content marketing material through social login can help increase traffic.

Marketers may be inspired to add Facebook Like and share option on every content page, and to use the Facebook commenting system to drive engagement on industry news and blog posts.

Other third-party login tools that yield responses include Google, used by 30 percent of Americans, Twitter (9 percent) and Yahoo (8 percent). Both Facebook and Google have seen their share in the social login market increase throughout 2012, however, Facebook still holds a sizable lead on Google. It has also shown growth in the past couple of months, with Brafton reporting that Janrain’s May edition of its study pegged the social giant at 42 percent of all website social logins.

Like it has in other sectors, Yahoo’s share of social logins has fallen considerably. In early 2011, the company accounted for about 15 percent of social logins, but its share has dropped below 10 percent in 2012.

For Yahoo, demonstrating its relevance is increasingly important, as many have wondered about the company’s future. Brafton recently highlighted Yahoo’s appointment of former Google executive Marissa Mayer as its new CEO, which many think could lead to a resurgence from the company.

Joe Meloni is Brafton's former Executive News and Content Writer. He studied journalism at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and has written for a number of print and web-based publications.