Mobile users can't get enough of the the T-Mobile's G2 launch, and the web is full of chatter about the new device - but very little of it is coming from T-Mobile.

Mobile users can't get enough of the T-Mobile's G2 launch, and the web is full of chatter about the new device – but very little of it is coming from T-Mobile. Instead, it seems the nation's fourth leading wireless provider is letting user-generated content do the marketing for its latest product.

At press time, T-Mobile G2 is the top Google Trends search query, classified as "on fire." A Google search for "T-Mobile G2" currently produces more than 5.94 million web results, and about 50 news results all generated within the past few hours.

Countless consumers have a lot to say about their excitement over the new device, and T-Mobile is letting them do the talking. PC World reports that the wireless provider launched a detailed G2 promo page earlier today, but at press time, this page seems to have been significantly pared down. The company is simply saying is that "the T-Mobile G2 will deliver tight integration with Google services and break new ground as the first smartphone designed to run at 4G speeds on our new HSPA+ network."

That seems to be all that is needed to spark users' interests, and they are ravenous for more information. One consumer posted a YouTube video of himself opening a message from T-Mobile stating "the G2 is coming," and the video has garnered nearly 100 views in just a couple of hours.

It seems like T-Mobile will be offering more info soon, as a T-Mobile G2 Facebook page has been launched (though it, too, has minimal information on it).

The takeaway message for marketers may be that sometimes less is more. By creating a teaser for fans, the user-generated content and hype surrounding this product is definitely generating brand awareness for T-Mobile. 

Katherine Griwert is Brafton's Marketing Director. She's practiced content marketing, SEO and social marketing for over five years, and her enthusiasm for new media has even deeper roots. Katherine holds a degree in American Studies from Boston College, and her writing is featured in a number of web publications.